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the department of homeland security is ability to prevent terrorists from traveling to the united states. we have an excellent panel of witnesses. i would remind the panelists and the committee that in remembrance of this day, 9/11, 11 years ago, we have some pictures on the back of this room that should remind everyone why this committee was formed. there will be a commemorative ceremony at 11:00 today. all the members of congress will be gathering, the house and senate, at the east center staircase for the ceremony marking in the observance of september 11th, 2001. this committee will be joining our other colleagues and we will have opening statements from myself and a ranking member, and then the statements of our witnesses. and we will see where we are on time, because we will probably have a hard break at about 10:50 a.m. our witnesses today are kevin mcclellan, acting assistant commissioner in customs and border protection, john woods, assistant director for national security investigation at ice, the deputy assistant secretary for visa services and the acting inspector general for homeland
latino president of the united states has been born. now, he could be, or she could be, an infant right now, or in second grade, or in high school, or maybe even in the united states senate. but it's clear from looking at the united states and the changes in our demography that latinos will continue to play a larger role in national dialogue. if you look at the specifics, in 2004, 7.6 million latinos are said to have voted in the united states. that's according to research that's been done at the national level. in 2008 in a presidential election, that jumped up to 9.7 million. now there are estimates that in this coming election in november, that the number could go all the way up to as high as 12 million. and that number is only going to grow, so i think it makes it all the more relevant to examine the life of somebody like marco rubio. in some respects i kind of think of him a little bit as almost a test case for how the american population relates to a latino politician. that was reason enough for me to write a book about him. because in the same way that you look at the reasons why
with an incumbent president of the united states. host: from the associated press this morning -- back to the phones and our discussion regarding early voting beginning in about 36 states. missouri is when we get our next phone call, and that is dan on the line for republicans. caller: good morning. i was going to say right off the bat, everybody in the united states should go see the movie "obama 2016." a gentleman said this movie up who went to college with obama. it goes through his life, his family, and his agenda for america. host: now you have plug the movie. tell us if you are in favor of early voting. caller: absolutely. the elderly have a problem, but also the working people. they have to go really early or really late. sometimes they do not get to vote. it is important to have early voting. i know of the debates are nice to watch. most of us already know who we are going to vote for. i know our country is sinking fast. if we do not get something done about the national debt, the port and the rich and everybody is down the tube. host:we haev a tweet from max that says -- is that where a lot
are reaction to a little-known amateur movie produced in the united states which ridiculed the prophet mohammed. it gained attention because an obscure florida pastor began promoting it, the same man who triggered deadly riots in afghanistan when he threatened to burn the koran. we want to go straight to cairo where we find nbc chief foreign correspondent, richard engel. richard, fill us in a little more this morning. >> reporter: good morning. a libyan source has told nbc news that the u.s. ambassador who was visiting the consulate was killed along with three others. not sure of the nationality of those three others. the u.s. state department has not confirmed this, but this has been told to us by a senior security source in libya. we've been also told that the libyan prime minister and the libyan president will both be speaking today about this subject, offering their condolences to the united states and to the family of the fallen ambassador. and this is according to the report. we were told that when gunmen and a mob stormed the consulate building, they first attacked it with rpgs, then the
last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
for coming. i remember not long ago when vice-president -- the vice- president visited the united states and i traveled to los angeles with our mayor at the time and what an event. and now a few months later, san francisco is probably hosting the seminar with the ministry of commerce. it shows that our golden mountain continues to attract chinese. has never stopped since the 1800's and because san francisco continues to be the city of innovation and full of peril spirit, we will continue to seek an inflow of inbound chinese businessmen and investors. may i invite our mayor, edwin lee, to the podium? [applause] >> thank you. good morning. i want to of course repeat our warm welcome, ladies and gentleman, to the vice minister and his delegation here. to the council general and his wonderful work and to our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom is here. our senior adviser, mr. rossi and those of you from fremont and san jose and around the bay area, thank you for being here on this first china-united states state and regional economic and trade discussion. as you know, san francisco has been ho
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 21, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader smed. mr. reid: i had move to proceed to calendar number 504. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 504, s. 3525, a bill to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fish, and shooting and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the next hour will be equally divided between the two leader leaders who are their designees.
of violence will shake the resolve of the united states of america. >> good morning. it is thursday, september 13th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, national affairs editor for "new york" magazine, john heilman, richard haass. and in washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. >> we have so much to talk about this morning. of course breaking news overnight. >> yeah. >> we, of course, have been focused on libya. yesterday we were focused on the political scrap that was taking place while we had chaotic situations across the globe. >> i'd say it was more than a scrap. >> i think it was a terrible moment, maybe a defining moment in the campaign, of course what's going on in egypt right now. is equally troubling. and i suspect that when the streets clear, perhaps the most troubling aftereffect of this will be what has not been said by the muslim brotherhood or the leaders of egypt. this morning we'll have to get to that later because this morning more breaking news. now out of yemen. >> yep. witnesses say hundreds of demonst
for the members of united states supreme court. they should have single terms. that's a small deal when we're talking that fundamental change. so let me suggest proposals that i would like to see argued about on c-span. and incidentally, let me also say because another question someone might have in mind come where did it come from. i have an answer to that. and it's based on a wonderful book written by paul woodruff called first democracy, which, in fact, returns to ancient athens and suggests that we select more leaders than we do our lottery. whether or not the house and senate should be selected by lottery we can debate, but it seems to me that it would be wonderful, select members of the convention by lottery. basically nationwide jury. then the three proposal i would like to hear them discuss, not necessary in order of importance, first of all, how do we adjust institutions developed in 1787 under the assumption of rule by the neville and political elites -- who would more or less share a notion of the public interest. how do we make those institutions congruent with the kind of part
reauthorization makes plain that discrimination is not the policy of these united states. it says no program funded by federal vawa dollars can turn away a domestic violence victim because of their sexual orientation or their gender identity, whether the victim is gay or straight, american indian, white, black or latino, in my view, madam president, and in the view of so many in this chamber, they deserve protection from abuse and justice for their abusers. there are two other important changes in this vawa reauthorization as passed through the senate. both of which help ensure we bring perpetrators to justice no national who their victims are or where the claims are committed. these help law enforcement to secure needed testimony from victims who are unwilling to come forward due to reasonable fears of deportation. so in total, all three of these important changes to the substance and scope of vawa i think strengthen it, i think carry forward its initial spirit and i think are completely appropriate things for this senate and the house to do in our every five-year reconsideration and reauth
/11 in the united states -- was that your testimony? >> is a daunting statistics. i got this information of a steve emerson's investigative product website, where he has all the court records of every single muslim are extremists arrested in the country since 9/11. that is my sources can pump. -- that is where my sources came from. >> many people in the community did not understand to sikhs -- who they were intel the tragedy occurred. how does the sikh fit into milwaukee before the tragedy, and how would you describe the outpouring corresponds that occurred? >> sikhs are a different religion, a different race -- they will come up to you and asking for you are. people do not ask towho sikhs are. if a person asks me, who am i? what is that on your head? i would love to tell them what it is. people do not do that. they should start doing that. to get the fact that it is right. it is a turban. >> ok. how have you been moving forward since the tragedy with respect to your place of worship and your ability to come and worship without fear? >> on my what? >> the level of fear that occurred when the traged
they hear that the president of the united states is no longer necessarily categorically calling egypt an ally? >> reporter: well, you know, quite honestly there's been a lot of confusion about what the u.s. role is right now and how the u.s. feels about egypt. before our revolution began, there was and continued to be a lot of anti-u.s. sentiment because of this support by various u.s. administrations for dictators in this region. but hearing the statement today, i think people are thinking, all right, well, whose side are you on because we're trying to get this revolution working and it has definitely confused a lot of people. >> all right, thank you so much for your time. i want to go directly to golden, colorado, where the president is speaking about the four who were killed in libya. >> serve in difficult and dangerous places all around the world, to advance the interests and the values that we hold dear as americans. and a lot of times their work goes unheralded, it doesn't get a lot of attention. but it is vitally important. we enjoy our security and our liberty because of the s
. what has the attention of analysts that the egyptian prime minister morsi pushed the united states for the release of the blibd sheikh, releasing demonstrations at the same site of the u.s. embassy. they tell fox that the egyptian group takes its name from the omar al rack man from the blind sheikh. >> inspired by the first world trade center bombings some it is a group that has been around a long time. it has some staying power clearly since the early '90s and it is a group we have looked at in the past, we have tracked in the past and we'll continue to ask questions in relation to this particular event to see if there is any connection. >> reporter: there the question is whether there is some degree of coordination or whether the demonstration we're seeing like those in yemen this morning are spontaneous. one group of demonstrators feeding off another. the second question is whether the governments that are relatively weak will have the ability to offer the security the united states needs for its embassies in those countries. congressman rogers told fox a pressing question is wh
that a third airplane flying over washington, d.c., very close to the building we are in, the united states capitol, went down the street less than a mile and crashed into the pentagon. and that was at 9:37 eastern time. then a fourth airplane, we remembered as flight 93, was flying toward washington, d.c., probably the capitol or the white house where some good right thinking folks took control of the plane from a high jacker an they were -- hi jacker and they were -- hijack er and they were crashed in a field. on september 11, 2001, this nation was attacked. 3,000 people were killed that day. it's interesting that the attackers decided to attack the world trade center because people from 90 nationalities were in the world trade center building. the south and the north. so it was more than an attack on america, it was an attack on the people of the world. freedom-loving people. people who believed in living life and liberty. the murder was done by 19 radicals who murdered in the name of religion. of the 3,000 people that were killed, 411 of them were emergency workers. 341 were members of
.c. landmark infested with algae. we want to welcome our viewers from the united states and the world. i'm wolf blitzer and you're in "the situation room." certainly a critical voting block. military voters out there, both president obama and mitt romney, they are aggressively kourting them. jim acosta is traveling with a governor romney and he has a lot going on right now, jim? >> that's right, wolf. and mitt romney is out to make the case that the best defense is a better economy. >> in battle ground virginia both president obama and mitt romney pulled out the heavy artillery. romney slammed the president for the defense cuts coming at the end of the year. >> it is still a troubled and dangerous world and the idea of cutting our military commitment by a trillion over this decade is unthinkable. and devastating. and when i become president of the united states, we will stop it. i will not cut our commitment to our military. >> the president once again blasted romney's hidden camera comments on the 47% of americans he dubbed victims of government dependence. >> i don't think we can get very far
of the united states? >> i don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy. they are a new government that is trying to find its way. they were democratically elected. i think that we will have to see how they respond to this incident. >> not an ally and not an enemy. two u.s. warships are moving in to coast along the coast of libya as the hunt continues for killers of four americans. president obama vowing justice and continuing search for the murderers and their motive. >> as for the ones we lost last night, i want to assure you we will bring their killers to justice. >> meanwhile mitt romney will hold a campaign event in virginia within the hour still causing a stir after doubling down on his criticism of president obama as an poll guest in chief. politicians here and home and oversay sea oversay sees debating the judgment. >> these are moments that test the characters of the candidates. >> there is a lack of leadership there and that's what i would be hoping about and i hope mitt romney will be looking at the big picture. >> i think it was a big mistake.
secure embassies that the united states has. it looks like they are very close to that front gate situation. the yemeni forces control the street, the outside perimeter of the embassy. there are checkpoints and anyone on that street who tries to approach the embassy is stopped well before they get there. this is a place that has seen many protests, has seen attacks, seen attempted attacks. one of the most secure. but let's be very cautious here. we have seen the unrest at u.s. installations over the last few days. reports are the yemeni forces are trying to control the situation. we will have to keep monitoring this in the coming hours. >> barbara, we are hearing about shots fired. is that some inside the embassy out or from outside the embassy in? >> well, the reports that i-witnesses are giving indicate that yemeni forces have been firing into the air at this point, trying to disperse the crowd. perhaps i think trying to move them away from the gate of the embassy, trying to move them back. there are a variety of security forces that are at the embassy as i say. it is on that st
to where they were, we were in belt largest expansion in the history of the united states. fix medicare. allow negotiations for prescription drugs. that will save $240 billion over 10 years, and finally, takeaway subsidies from the big oil companies. they are very profitable, but they do not need our help. what you end up with then is not a $1 trillion problem. you end up with a problem in the $200 billion range. raising the ceiling, a default for the nation. he spoke out against the fairfax chamber and other chambers, and now he is saying, "wait a minute. we cannot make cuts." when he is running as the guy who wants to make cuts. he has more sides then a rubik cube. >> what your so-called plan would do to jobs. i think you should be taking into account what the impact is on jobs, and our economy, which is a major, major concern. you talked about bob mcdonnell and eric cantor. what they did was pass a measure that would avert these devastating cuts to our national defense and jobs in virginia. what has this than that done? absolutely nothing. they have not passed a budget in 3.5 years.
the united states, in fact, for something like this. i think thers going to be a lot of, you know, the u.s. is really going to hunker down and think about how they want to proceed now. not just in libya but in the whole region. >> elise, this is brooke. let me just, as john points out, you know, diplomats really are certainly mourning this morning and we're covering the ory, really there's no way any other network can. if we can just back up and if you can help us fill in the blanks as far as what exactly happened. here we are day two now of protests. we've been covering the protests in cairo and in benghazi. we remember covering the revolution, it was really the rebel stronghold last year. explain what exactly happened as far as this ambassador is concerned and the three other workers who were apparently with him in his car? >> details are very sketchy right now. what we understand is we knew yesterday, towards the end of the day, that as we were watching those pictures at the embassy in cairo, there were gunmen that had approached the u.s. consulate in benghazi, and breached the walls
of the united states, we will stop it. i will not cut our commitment to our military. >> the president once again blasted romney's hidden camera comments on the 47% of americans he dubbed victims of government dependence. >> i don't think we can get very far with heed lookers who write-off half the nation as a bunch of victims who never take responsibility for their own lives. >> 47% people of the people -- >> the obama campaign turned romney's remarks into a devastating new ad playing the words under the faces of families and veterans. >> and they will vote for this president no matter what. so my job is not worry about those people. they should take personal responsibility. >> reporter: romney who has courted veterans two days in a row. he's seizing on new economic data. from 1.7% to 1.3. >> this is not just one quarter. this has been going on now for years. china is growing much faster than we, russia is growing faster than we. our economy needs to be reinvigorated. >> reporter: the labor department announced it undercounted nearly 400,000 jobs in 2011. meaning that 4.4 million jobs have
the united states. he has served as president as the atlantic monthly magazine, executive vice president of u.s. news and world report, and the co-editor of roll-call. we are delighted that he is here to comment on the subject. >> i want to begin by congratulating the doug and bill. this is an excellent study and i have to say i have read about three dozens of these and i even wrote one of them, which some people consider the best. this is an excellent report, for reasons i will go into. it urges america to show how to organize the government to do that. the current administration, not just the war of ideas as an activity, but the very phrase is now anathema, a sad development. this became evident to me when i started meeting with members of the foreign-policy team and was warned it would be unwise if i wanted to have any impact on their thinking to use the term "war of ideas." i am not sure which of the two is more offensive. my own authorization was clear. in the long run, winning the war on terror means winning the battle of ideas. it could not be clearer than that. around the same time, p
country. your choice. >>> we would like to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world to this, the democratic national convention, as charlotte, north carolina. i'm on the convention floor, i'm wolf blitzer. the first lady of the united states, michelle obama, has tonight's most critical job, reminding voters why they liked her husband enough to put him in the white house, and to make the case for giving him another four years. ining us now inrco all of thiweek,nderson cooper, high above the floor. >> our w sws whyhat case is more urgent than ever for the democrat. nesn mitt romney's convention bous. what are the numbers? their convtion tonight, ts let'slook at that very question. we know governor romney got a one-point bounce out of his convention, not so great, about half what the president got four years ago. not a big bounce. where does that leave us? the democrats' opening night two months from a critical election day. doesn't get any closer than that. 48-48. >> the convention will pay tribute to a champion of health care reform, the late senator edward kennedy,
if the united states had agreed to the retention of the institution of the emperor. that's from a book called "the pathology of power," norman cousins. leo jilad was the first scientist to conceive how an atomic might be made in 1933. he speaks of a meeting with the head scientist of the manhattan project. here's the quote. i told oppenheimer it would be a great mistake to use the bomb generals cities of japan. well, don't you think that if we tell the russians what we intend to do and use the bomb in japan, the russians will understand it? they'll understand it only tool well, jilad replied. brigadier general clark, who was the military intelligence officer preparing for preparing intercepted japanese cables, quote, when we didn't need to do it and we knew we didn't need to do it, and they knew that we didn't need to do it, we used them as an experiment for two atomic bombs, unquote. this is quoted in "the decision to use the atomic bomb." perowicz said i think it can be proven that the bottom was not only unnecessary but knowing in advance not to be necessary. another quote, the japanese po
. the assembly will hear now and address by barack obama, president of the united states of america. a request for a call to -- his recognize his excellency. [applause] on behalf of the general assembly, i am honored to welcome to the united nations, barack obama. and to invite him to address the assembly. >> mr. president, secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentlemen, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grand valley california. the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, he joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria. from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, a riding on a cargo ship. as america's representative, w
enormous pleasure to welcome to the podium united states secretary of education arne duncan. [applause] [applause] >> thank you so much for that kind introduction. you don't want me in the treasury. i'm going keep the remarks brief. i would love to have a conversation with you. i'm thrilled to get in the focus on education. it's important for the country to be engaging in. a lot of challenges and hard work ahead of us. with i think we have a chance to breakthrough in fundamental way. i'll give you a snapshot where we think we are, where we're trying to go and the next stipes. a couple of numbers haunt me. 25% dropout rate in the country. that's a million of kids leaving our schools. no good jobs out there for them. and many of the african and latino that 40, 50, 60%. we are devastating entire communities unless we [inaudible] we used to lead the world in college graduate. today we are 1 4th. we wonder why we are struggling economically. i continue to think about the skill set in a time of employment rates we have as much as 2 million high wage high skills jobs that we can't fill. i thi
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
it was an extraordinary visit would against nixon by times which only one of the person in history of the united states could you give of for or against five times, franklin delano roosevelt. he could vote on the national ticket five times. so if you're in a national audience watching on -- watching on c-span to come to the nixon library. here's my presidential trivia. there are only four colleges in the united states which have graduated presidents and starting quarterbacks in the super bowl. what are those? so good thinking right now. i'll give you the easiest one of wall. the united states naval academy. jimmy carter. that's pretty easy. the university of michigan which i already mentioned, gerald ford and some pretty. of course the starting quarterback for the navy was roger stop back. and if you think, california, it's pretty easy to come up with stanford for much harder graduated and promote jim and john denver graduated, but starting quarterback in the super bowl. then last one is really hard but have given you a clue. have already said his last name. benjamin harrison who matriculated at miami
is flying at half staff. ladies and gentlemen, the national anthem of the united states. [playing "the star-spangled benneranner"] >> ladies and gentleman, the united states army chief of chaplain, major general. >> let us pray. remember the events of september 11, 2001. pray for all of those who greek today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack -- pray for all of those who grieve today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack, on a day when the worst visited our nation, our spirits were inspired what we saw at grand 0 and at the pentagon. we pray for the men and women who have been called to defend our country both at home and abroad. inspired by their legacy, we ask for continued courage and strength in spirit to faithfully serve our military and our nation. we are thankful that in our time of loss, you have not abandoned us to our grief. help us so that we may do your work, peace and justice, offering forgiveness and building community. hear us, lord god, in your holy name we pray. amen. >> a mamen. >> 11 years ago, the pentagon was attacked. please join us in obs
saying, the embassy of the united states in kay row condemns the continuing efforts by misguided individuals to hurt religious feelings of muslims as we condemn hurt thosecondemn efforts to offend believers of all religious. later, no one was hurt and protesters eventually disbanded. as that situation in egypt was winding down, the situation in libya was getting worse. so ten hours after the statement was issued in cairo at about 4:00 in the afternoon then attackers in libya entered the american consulate in benghazi and started firing. three americans were trapped inside including ambassador stevens. if this were not enough of a crisis going on, back at home mitt romney decides to weigh in before it's even clear what is going on in libya. so at 10:30 last night romney issues a statement attacking the cairo embassy's statement earlier, when those guys were just trying to diffuse the situation on the ground. romney said in his statement last night, it's disgraceful that the obama administration's first response was not to condemn attacks on our top plow our diplomatic missions but
of the united states, leader of the free world and so my question was how does he do it, how does he decide and make decisions? how does he govern? tom goldstein and "los angeles times" supreme court correspondent david savage diprete view of the supreme court new term starts october 1st. this one hour and 15 minute discussion was part of a forum hosted by the cato institute here in washington earlier this week. >> our conference concludes with a look ahead to october term 2012. the court's docket as of today is a bit sparse, but not without have to. indeed, were it not for last terms obamacare and the sv1070 cases you could say the coming term would be the term of the decade. the first to sittings the court will hear cases on property rights, racial preferences and higher education, and the fourth amendment as well as a follow-up to the class-action blockbuster from a couple years ago, wal-mart for nurses do. cato followed the cases as well as in several other but if granted would be high profile as well. challenges to section 5 of the voting rights act and the scope of the treaty power, f
by increasing border security and the economic downturn in the united states. but there is also a strong argument that better opportunities in mexico have also been a key factor for this phenomenon. for the first time ever, net migration to the u.s. is zero on average. however, we must not forget that immigration is a natural phenomena in for two countries. and has been going on for as long as the united states and mexico have existed. it will continue to happen naturally. our economies are clearly complementary. they're labor-intensive economies and have the ability to supply a capital intensive economy such as the u.s. with quality, hard workers. this is what i believe, that the agenda for the future should continue to focus on legal migration in a secure, and orderly what way to secure the u.s. economy and so that mexicans do not have to die while trying to get a job. we can work together to find solutions to these kinds of problems of so that many workers do not live in the shadows of these societies. -- this society. and i want to take the opportunity to once again recognize preside
wanted to, first of all, i believe in check and balances in the constitution, and the united states says we should have. i don't want one party running anything. the bottom line is people -- i think 80% of the people in the united states don't even know the constitution, and for limited government, not as a progressive, which, by the way, is what obama is, a progressive, just like hillary clinton, who admitted she was. host: let's not go too far off the rails here. i understand that the constitution, the check and balances that the constitution refers to is between the legislative, the judicial, and the executive branch, and doesn't really mention the establishment of a two-party system. caller: you need a two-party system. look what happened the first two years -- even though it took obama two years to get the healthcare through, they still had everything right there. unless you have a complete representative, you know, in there that represents everyone and just not one side, like all progressives or all republicans, you don't have those checks and balances, whether it's the legislative
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
be described as young a. >> thank you so much. there is no organization in the united states that is better at serving as a forum for the principal legal issues of the day fo. i have been asked to comment as well on the voting rights. kerrey has done such a good job. there is very little to add. then i will talk about the business cases. the two. i would make about the act is first to think about why it is the justices would get involved. these cases are not in the docket. in the illustration in to help the court work. the justices have a rule that says if we're point to strike down a federal statute, that is our job. they're likely to step in. the voting rights act case, several of them come on a peel. you have to ask the supreme court to grant review. there are slivers of cases in the united states coal that there is a right to go to the supreme court. they have different ways of dodging them. we almost have to take. they suggested very serious concerns about the constitutionality of section 5. the second point out and make is what to expect from the pivotal justices. this is at the cente
that the united states has to survive. it has to survive to show the world that the representative governments can work. the kids in 1848 in a series of revolutions in europe as they see it a failed as the democratic revolution, and so they see the united states this is it, the world's last shot. it has to work your order will never be tried again. so the states think they can destroy the government which is how the unions see it because they don't like to get elected. they said self-government doesn't work, so we have to prove that the thing can survive and that's how they start. but you don't have to be in a very long before they begin to think why do they get into this to begin with? talk to this virus and slaves -- southerners and slaves and they got into the problem to begin with because the institution of slavery. if you want to solve a problem, the only way to do it is to root out the cause. so union soldiers made a shift much earlier than i had anticipated. the big shift begins in the summer of 1861 with soldiers beginning to write home to their families and elected officials to say that i
, wherever they are in the world, are protected by the full force of the united states government. i would like to see our nation grow strong again. you don't ever touch one of our citizens wherever we are in the world. if you do, the wrath of the united states government will come down on you. host: among the two major candidates, who do you believe best exemplifies that or do you trust most with foreign policy? caller: mitt romney. his statement may be a week or so ago when he said we need to be so strong that no one would dare touch us -- it seems we are in a position now that we are left at all over the world. nobody is afraid to take on the united states government and more and that is really said. host: let's move on to jean in north bend, washington, our line for independents. ♪ caller: thanks for taking my call. i trust president obama. i pretty much agree with the gentle man but called before the republican lady. i think there are too many loose cannons in the world already. we don't need mitt romney who is really a loose cannon out there to represent us. i think we have gained
trying to find solutions to the problems of the united states of america. if he loves the united states of america, he should be out on his hinny getting this stuff done instead of talking all over this television and running romney down. host: thanks for the call from dayton, tennessee. want to give you one more story on the day, this from "the washington post," for politicians privacy vanishes in the age of video technology. mitt romney's mistake in speaking bluntly at a may fundraiser was not only in the words he spoke but failing to anticipate the ears they might breach, and audience that looked like an exclusive group of republican donors this week multiflied thanks to the pervasiveness of video technology. they are already confiscating smart phones but they have been largely overmatched as time and again moments intended to be kept secret have turned up on the internet. there is a total collapse of the notion of private space that the republican strategist, and top advisor of senator john mccain's presidential campaign in 2008, increasingly, politicians who say one thing behind cl
the world, american embassies and even german and british beamtions are on high alert. united states marines so-called fast teams. teams to secure embassies are being dispatched throughout the middle east to ensure the safety of our personnel abroad in many public squares across the middle east, flags are being burned and embassies are attempting to be entered by some of these protesters. a terrifying map if you think about it it includes not just countries you would expect to experience unrest. countries like tunisia that you would think relatively unstable. that as it at this that that that -- >> jay carney, the white house press secretary says something eyebrow-raising and interesting yesterday when he was asked what the source of all this unrest is. let's listen: this is a fairly volatile situation not in response to united states policy. not to to obviously the administration or the american people. it is response to it a video, a film that we have a judged to be reprehensible and disgusting. that in no way justifies any violent reaction to it, but this is not a case of protest directe
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
of the united states. >> find any speech from both the democratic and republican conventions online at the c-span video library. >> during the republican and democratic conventions, we're asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president, as part of this year's c-span student cam video documentary competition. in a short video, students will answer the question, what's the most important issue the president should consider in 2013? for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000, and there's $50,000 in total prizes available. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grade 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to student cam.org. >> i want c-span, c-span2 and the books portion of c-span, because i feel it's important to be knowledgeable about what's going on in the world, and i feel that c-span gives the most information about what's going on in specific subjects, where a lot of television doesn't do that. >> hillary pate watches c-span on comcast. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
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